Fiber Optic


  DVI Extender over Fiber with Self-Detecting EDID, EMI Shielding, extends up to 1000m

DVI Extender over Fiber with Self-Detecting EDID, EMI Shielding, extends up to 1000m

Overview Avenview FO-DVI-1000M-EMIX DVI Extender over Fiber lets you extend digital flat panel signal up to 500 meters (1650 feet) at...
Model : FO-DVI-1000M-EMIX

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  DVI Extender over single LC Fiber with TMDS video and EDID data extends up to 300m

DVI Extender over single LC Fiber with TMDS video and EDID data extends up to 300m

  Overview Avenview FO-DVI-1080X-SET, Optical DVI extension module, is designed to let digital flat panel display extend over...
Model : FO-DVI-1080X-SET

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  DVI-D Extender over Fiber Optical Cable, HDCP Compliant

DVI-D Extender over Fiber Optical Cable, HDCP Compliant

Overview The DVI-D Fiber Optical Extension Cable locates a single link digital DVI display up to 330 feet from a computer with no loss...
Model : FO-DVI-XX-MM

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  HDMI Extender over Fiber, extends up to 1080p (1920 x 1200) at 100 meters (330 feet), HDCP Compliant

HDMI Extender over Fiber, extends up to 1080p (1920 x 1200) at 100 meters (330 feet), HDCP Compliant

Overview Avenview FO-HDM-SET (old model number FO-HDMI-SET) consists of a Transmitter and Receiver that lets you extend HDMI signal...
Model : FO-HDM-SET

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  HDMI Extender over Single Fiber Optic with EMI Shielding, up to 1000 meters

HDMI Extender over Single Fiber Optic with EMI Shielding, up to 1000 meters

Overview Avenview FO-HDM-1000M-EMI (Old Model number: FO-HDMI-1000M-EMI) optical HDMI extension module over 1SC Type Fiber Optic Cable,...
Model : FO-HDM-1000M-EMI

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  HDMI Extender up to 20 KM over Fiber Optic with IR Support

HDMI Extender up to 20 KM over Fiber Optic with IR Support

Overview FO-HDM-IP4K-SET, HDMI extender set is designed to provide a long haul video signal transmission over fiber optic cable at...
Model : FO-HDM-IP4K-SET

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  HDMI Fiber Optical Cable, HDCP Compliant

HDMI Fiber Optical Cable, HDCP Compliant

Overview Avenview HDM Extenderr, FO-HDM-XX-MM (old model number FO-HDMI-XX-MM) Series with fiber optic cable system lets you extend HDTV...
Model : FO-HDM-XX-MM

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  Optional Power Adapter for Fiber Optic Extenders

Optional Power Adapter for Fiber Optic Extenders

Optional Power Adapter for Fiber Optic Extenders. Following products are compatible with PS-FO-DVI Power Adapter. ITEM DESCRIPTION...
Model : PS-FO-DVI

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An optical fiber (or optical fiber) is a flexible, transparent fiber made of high quality extruded glass (silica) or plastic, slightly thicker than a human hair. It can function as a wave guide, or “light pipe”, [1] to transmit light between the two ends of the fiber. [2] The field of applied science and engineering, concerned with the design and application of optical fibers, is known as fiber optics. Optical fibers are widely used in fiber-optic communications, which permit transmission over longer distances and at higher bandwidths (data rates) than other forms of communication. Fibers are used instead of metal wires because signals travel along them with less loss and are also immune to electromagnetic interference. Fibers are also used for illumination and are wrapped in bundles so that they may be used to carry images, thus allowing visibility in confined spaces. Specially designed fibers are used for a variety of other applications, including sensors and fiber lasers.

Optical fibers typically include a transparent core surrounded by a transparent cladding material with a lower index of refraction. Light is kept in the core by total internal reflection. This causes the fiber to act as a waveguide. Fibers that support many propagation paths or transverse modes are called multi-mode fibers (MMF). The fibers that only support a single mode are called single-mode fibers (SMF). Multi-mode fibers generally have a wider core diameter, and are used for short-distance communication links and for applications where high power must be transmitted. Single-mode fibers are used for most communication links longer than 1,050 meters (3,440 ft).

Multi-mode fiber

The propagation of light through a multi-mode optical fiber.
A laser bouncing down an acrylic rod, illustrating the total internal reflection of light in a multi-mode optical fiber.

Fiber with a large core diameter (greater than 10 micrometers) may be analyzed by geometrical optics. Such fiber is called multi-mode fiber, from the electromagnetic analysis (see below). In a step-index multi-mode fiber, rays of light are guided along the fiber core by total internal reflection. Rays that meet the core-cladding boundary at a high angle (measured relative to a line normal to the boundary), greater than the critical angle for this boundary, are completely reflected. The critical angle (minimum angle for total internal reflection) is determined by the difference in index of refraction between the core and cladding materials. Rays that meet the boundary at a low angle are refracted from the core into the cladding, and do not convey light and hence information along the fiber. The critical angle determines the acceptance angle of the fiber, often reported as a numerical aperture. A high numerical aperture allows light to propagate down the fiber in rays both close to the axis and at various angles, allowing efficient coupling of light into the fiber. However, this high numerical aperture increases the amount of dispersion since rays at different angles have different path lengths and therefore take different times to traverse the fiber.

Optical fiber types

In graded-index fiber, the index of refraction in the core decreases continuously between the axis and the cladding. This causes light rays to bend smoothly as they approach the cladding, rather than reflecting abruptly from the core-cladding boundary. The resulting curved paths reduce multi-path dispersion because high angle rays pass more through the lower-index periphery of the core, rather than the high-index center. The index profile is chosen to minimize the difference in axial propagation speeds of the various rays in the fiber. This ideal index profile is very close to a parabolic relationship between the index and the distance from the axis.